COVID19: Quarantined With a Toddler

COVID19: Quarantined With a Toddler

Elizabeth Carter

March 18, 2020

This article is part of a special series covering the 2020 outbreak of COVID-19.


I’ll tell everyone that the “social distancing” with my two-year-old was a blessing and a curse, that we were lucky we have a home with food and electricity and Wi-Fi, a family that could help us financially, and that I was just happy we were healthy and had access to healthcare if we did get sick. While all that is true, most of the time I just feel like I’m going stir-crazy. 

I am glued to my phone with the sound of my kid’s annoying toys playing constantly. When I had face-to-face classes every week, I got a break from those upbeat songs that got stuck in your head, and now it’s all day everyday. Every social media post, email, news alert, and text message has been about COVID-19, and that combined with the repetitive music creates an ominous feeling, a mix between annoyance, exhaustion, and anxiety. The first Monday after spring break, I thought this whole thing would blow over and that it was impossible for classes to be cancelled. By Wednesday, every surface my son touched I frantically wiped down, not to mention every toy he owned. We went from every-other-day baths to daily baths, just to be preventative. By the weekend, I could tell he was ready to get out of the house, so we have been taking nice long walks with the dog. 

For the most part, I think I’m taking advantage of the quarantined time. My son and I have been able to get some spring cleaning done, as well as lots of reading and art. I know that I have been privileged to be able to stay home with my son while my fiancé still earns an income, but trips to the library and museum as well as playdates are just not as great over video chat. To all those other quarantined parents–stay strong. Maybe they’ll get tired of watching “Frozen 2” by April.


Elizabeth Carter is a Professional Writing senior who enjoys developmental and copy editing, grant writing, and social media management. After graduation, she plans to pursue a career in political writing, and possibly work on a campaign. When she is not reading, writing, or cross-stitching, she is spending time with her husband and two-year-old son.